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Squirrels Found in Ontario: A Comprehensive Guide

Updated: Apr 23, 2023



Gray Squirrels


Gray squirrels are a familiar sight to many residents of Ontario, Canada. They are one of the most commonly observed animals in the region and are often seen running across lawns, climbing trees, or scampering along power lines. In this article, we will provide a comprehensive guide to gray squirrels in Ontario, including their physical characteristics, behavior, habitat, diet, breeding, and more.


Physical Characteristics

Gray squirrels are medium-sized rodents, with an average length of 18 inches, including their bushy tail, which can make up almost half of their body length. They can weigh between 400-600 grams and are typically larger than other species of squirrels found in Ontario. Their fur is predominantly gray, with white underparts, but they can also have some brown fur mixed in. They have a bushy tail, large, rounded ears, and black eyes.


Gray squirrels are not the only color variety found in Ontario. There are also black squirrels, which are simply a melanistic color variation of the gray squirrel. Black squirrels have the same size and body shape as gray squirrels, but their fur is entirely black. They are most commonly found in the southern regions of Ontario. Around the Toronto Area and Hamilton.


Behaviour and Habitat

Gray squirrels are diurnal, meaning they are active during the day. They are arboreal, spending most of their time in trees, and are known for their ability to jump from tree to tree. They have a well-developed sense of balance and coordination, which allows them to move quickly and easily through the trees.Gray squirrels are social animals and are known to live in groups, particularly during the winter months when they share nests to stay warm. They are also territorial and will defend their nests and food sources from other squirrels.Gray squirrels are adaptable animals and can be found in a variety of habitats, including urban, suburban, and rural areas. They are commonly found in wooded areas, parks, and residential neighborhoods with mature trees.


Diet


Gray squirrels are opportunistic feeders and can eat a variety of foods, including nuts, fruits, seeds, and insects. They are also known to raid bird feeders and gardens in search of food. In the fall, they will gather and store nuts and seeds to prepare for the winter months when food is scarce. They are also known to eat bark, fungi, and small animals, such as insects and bird eggs.


Breeding

Gray squirrels breed twice a year, once in the late winter and again in the summer. Mating season typically occurs in January and February, and the gestation period is around 44 days. Female gray squirrels give birth to litters of 2-5 offspring, and the young are born blind and helpless. They are weaned at around 10 weeks old and will leave the nest to establish their territories around 12-14 weeks old.Gray squirrels have a relatively long lifespan for a small mammal, with some individuals living up to 20 years in captivity. In the wild, they typically live for 3-4 years, but some have been known to live up to 10 years.


Threats


Gray squirrels in Ontario are not considered endangered or threatened, but they do face some threats, particularly in urban areas. One of the biggest threats to gray squirrels is habitat loss, as urbanization and development continue to encroach on their natural habitats. They are also at risk of being hit by cars, electrocution on power lines, and predation by domestic cats and birds of prey.


Flying Squirrels of Ontario: A Closer Look at These Fascinating Gliders



Flying squirrels are one of the most unique species of squirrels found in Ontario, Canada. Known for their ability to glide through the air, these adorable creatures have captured the hearts of many nature enthusiasts. In this article, we will delve into the physical characteristics, behavior, habitat, diet, breeding, and more of flying squirrels in Ontario.


Physical Characteristics


Flying squirrels are small, with an average length of 20-30 cm, including their tail, which can be 10-14 cm long. They weigh between 85-150 g and have a flattened body shape, which allows them to glide. Their large, dark eyes and flattened tail help to maintain balance and steer while gliding. They have soft, thick fur that ranges from gray-brown to reddish-brown in color.

Behavior and Habitat


Flying squirrels are nocturnal and arboreal, spending most of their time in trees. They are not capable of sustained flight but use their gliding ability to move from tree to tree. They can glide for up to 90 meters in a single jump and reach heights of up to 30 meters. Flying squirrels are social animals and can be found in groups of up to 20 individuals. They also have a unique behavior where they huddle together to keep warm in cold weather.


Flying squirrels can be found throughout Ontario's forests, including mixed deciduous and coniferous forests. They prefer old-growth forests that have abundant trees with holes and crevices, which they use for nesting and hiding from predators. They also have a preference for areas with an abundance of food sources, including nuts, seeds, and fruits.


Diet


Flying squirrels have a diverse diet that includes nuts, seeds, fruits, insects, and fungi. They are known to store food in their nests for the winter months when food is scarce. They are also an important food source for predators such as owls, hawks, and Martens.


Breeding


Flying squirrels have a breeding season that typically occurs in late winter or early spring. Mating occurs in February and March, and the gestation period is around 40 days. Female flying squirrels give birth to litters of 2-7 offspring, which are born hairless and with their eyes closed. The young are weaned at around 6 weeks old and become independent at around 3 months old.

Threats


Flying squirrels face a range of threats in Ontario, including habitat loss due to deforestation and urbanization. They are also at risk of being preyed upon by predators such as owls, hawks, and martens. In addition, they can be negatively impacted by climate change, which can alter their habitat and food sources.


Conservation Efforts


Flying squirrels are not considered endangered or threatened in Ontario, but their populations have declined in some areas due to habitat loss. Conservation efforts have focused on protecting old-growth forests and ensuring that logging practices do not disrupt their habitat. Education and awareness campaigns have also been launched to raise awareness about the importance of preserving the species and their habitat.


Research has been conducted to better understand the behavior and ecology of flying squirrels in Ontario. This information can be used to develop effective conservation strategies and management plans for the species.


Red Squirrels of Ontario: An In-Depth Look at These Energetic Creatures



Red squirrels are a common sight throughout the forests of Ontario, Canada. These lively creatures are known for their high-pitched chattering and their bold behavior, which makes them a favorite among many nature enthusiasts. In this article, we will explore the physical characteristics, behavior, habitat, diet, and breeding of red squirrels in Ontario.

Physical Characteristics


Red squirrels are small, with an average length of 23-28 cm, including their tail, which can be 8-13 cm long. They weigh between 140-280 g and have reddish-brown fur on their back, with a white underside. They have long, bushy tails that help them maintain balance and climb trees. Their large eyes are positioned on the sides of their head, which gives them a wide field of vision.

Behaviour and Habitat

Red squirrels are active during the day and spend most of their time in trees. They are known for their bold behavior and loud chattering, which they use to communicate with other squirrels and warn of potential danger. They are territorial and will defend their territory against other squirrels, including their own kind.

Red squirrels can be found throughout Ontario's forests, including coniferous and mixed deciduous forests. They prefer mature forests with an abundance of food sources, including nuts, seeds, and cones. They are also known to store food in caches for the winter months when food is scarce.


Diet

Red squirrels have a diverse diet that includes nuts, seeds, fruits, and insects. They are known for their ability to strip the scales off pine cones to access the seeds inside. They also have a preference for the seeds of spruce, fir, and hemlock trees. Red squirrels are an important food source for predators such as hawks, owls, and Martens.


Breeding

Red squirrels have a breeding season that typically occurs in late winter or early spring. Mating occurs in February and March, and the gestation period is around 35 days. Female red squirrels give birth to litters of 2-7 offspring, which are born hairless and with their eyes closed. The young are weaned at around 8 weeks old and become independent at around 3-4 months old.


Threats


Red squirrels face a range of threats in Ontario, including habitat loss due to deforestation and urbanization. They are also at risk of being preyed upon by predators such as hawks, owls, and martens. In addition, they can be negatively impacted by climate change, which can alter their habitat and food sources.


Conservation Efforts

Red squirrels are not considered endangered or threatened in Ontario, but their populations have declined in some areas due to habitat loss. Conservation efforts have focused on protecting mature forests and ensuring that logging practices do not disrupt their habitat. Education and awareness campaigns have also been launched to raise awareness about the importance of preserving the species and their habitat.


Research has been conducted to better understand the behavior and ecology of red squirrels in Ontario. This information can be used to develop effective conservation strategies and management plans for the species.


The Fascinating Fox Squirrels of Ontario's Pelee Island



Pelee Island, located in Lake Erie, is the southernmost populated point in Canada and is home to a unique population of fox squirrels. These squirrels are the only native squirrel species found on the island and are a rare and fascinating sight for visitors and residents alike. In this article, we will explore the physical characteristics, behavior, habitat, diet, breeding, and more of fox squirrels in Ontario's Pelee Island.


Physical Characteristics


Fox squirrels are larger than gray squirrels, with an average length of 56 cm, including their tail, which can be up to 28 cm long. They are also heavier than gray squirrels, with an average weight of 0.45-0.91 kg. Fox squirrels have distinctive rusty-red fur on their back and sides, with a white belly and black mask around their eyes. Their ears are shorter and less prominent than those of gray squirrels, and their tail is bushy but not as full as a gray squirrel's tail.


Behaviour and Habitat


Fox squirrels are diurnal, like gray squirrels, and spend most of their time in trees. They are known for their ability to climb high into trees and for their impressive jumping abilities, which can span distances of up to 6 m. Fox squirrels are also excellent swimmers and can traverse the waters surrounding Pelee Island.

The habitat of fox squirrels is different from gray squirrels, as they prefer open areas with scattered trees and bushes. In Pelee Island, they can be found in orchards, vineyards, and along the shores of the island's wetlands. They also live in forests, but only in areas where there is enough sunlight to support the growth of understory plants.


Diet


The diet of fox squirrels is similar to that of gray squirrels, consisting of nuts, seeds, fruits, and insects. However, fox squirrels on Pelee Island have also been known to consume agricultural crops, such as corn and grapes. This has led to conflicts with local farmers, who view the squirrels as pests.


Breeding


Fox squirrels breed once a year, typically in late winter or early spring. Mating season occurs between January and March, and the gestation period is around 45 days. Female fox squirrels give birth to litters of 2-6 offspring, and the young are born blind and hairless. They are weaned at around 8-10 weeks old and become independent around 4-5 months old.


Threats


Fox squirrels on Pelee Island face some threats, including habitat loss due to development and predation by domestic cats and birds of prey. They are also at risk of being hit by cars, as they are known to traverse the island's roads in search of food.

Conservation Efforts


Fox squirrels are not considered endangered or threatened in Canada, but the population on Pelee Island is of particular concern. The island's unique ecosystem and small size make it vulnerable to changes in its environment, and the presence of fox squirrels is an important part of that ecosystem. Efforts have been made to educate locals and visitors about the importance of preserving the island's natural habitats and wildlife, including the fox squirrel population.


Research has been conducted to better understand the biology and ecology of fox squirrels on Pelee Island, as well as their interactions with humans and other species. This information can be used to develop effective conservation strategies and management plans for the species.



If you have a problem with squirrels in your home or business, Integrity Wildlife Control can help. Our team of experts uses humane methods and specialized equipment to remove squirrels from your property and prevent them from returning.


We understand the importance of treating these creatures with respect and care. That's why we never use harmful traps or relocate squirrels, as this can cause stress and harm to the animal, and it may not be able to survive in a new environment. Instead, we use one-way doors and exclusion methods to safely and humanely remove squirrels from your property. This process involves sealing off any entry points that the squirrels are using to gain access to your property and installing one-way doors to allow them to leave but not re-enter.


Once we are confident that all the squirrels have left, we will seal off any remaining entry points and ensure that your property is squirrel-proof to prevent any future infestations.


We take pride in our ability to solve any squirrel problems you may have with integrity and professionalism. We work quickly and efficiently to minimize any disruption to your daily routine and ensure that the squirrels are treated with the care and respect they deserve.

If you're dealing with a squirrel invasion, don't hesitate to contact us at 1-289-272-9453 or request a quote on our website. We're here to help you navigate the process of squirrel removal with integrity.


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